#wahm #homebiz Guitar Aerobics: A 52-Week, One-lick-per-day Workout Program for Developing, Improving and Maintaining Guitar Technique Bk/online audio

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3 Responses to “#wahm #homebiz Guitar Aerobics: A 52-Week, One-lick-per-day Workout Program for Developing, Improving and Maintaining Guitar Technique Bk/online audio”

  1. Braden E. Bost says:
    443 of 453 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Six weeks in–almost nothing but praise for this book. // SIX MONTH UPDATE // FINAL UPDATE, May 15, 2011
    By 
    Braden E. Bost (Seattle, WA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Guitar Aerobics: A 52-Week, One-lick-per-day Workout Program for Developing, Improving and Maintaining Guitar Technique Bk/online audio (Paperback)

    Today I finish Week 6 in this book, and I honestly have only good things to say about it. Well–only good things at the end of it all, that is.

    * Its day-by-day structure helps easily-distracted players like me keep a schedule. It will quickly become useless if you miss days, skip exercises, or try to use it irregularly. With that in mind, I’ve been able to stick with it every day, which keeps me playing everyday. Quite the feat. You COULD try to use it as a source for guitar licks, but that’s not what this is meant to be and there are better books for that.

    * If one’s serious about using this as the skeleton to their practice method, as I have, you actually have to develop an advancement system on your own. They don’t provide one. You have the daily exercise in notation and tab, a couple short paragraphs on what it’s teaching and a quick tip on how to properly play it, or how to get a little more out of it (such as switching up the picking style, etc.), the bpm speed range that the rhythm CD will provide, and a couple other small tidbits of information. Unless you’re an extremely gifted player, you’re not going to master even the first lick at its top speed of 112 bpm on the first day. You need to keep coming back to it for a while. Also, by the time you get to the first Friday’s exercise, there’s no way you’ll master it the first day–I still goof it up. Plus, rushing through each one to max out the speed is not useful. You need to spend time with each one at slower speeds before cranking up the metronome. Such is basic practice knowledge.
    It took me a bit, but I developed a plan of attack that I like. I start each new exercise at the slowest recommended staring speed, so far 40 bpm in every case. Once I’ve practiced it for a while and feel that I have it down at that speed, I bump the metronome up +10 bpm to 50, and move to yesterday’s exercise, which I did yesterday at 40. Once I have that down at 50, I go +10 bpm again to the day before yesterday’s exercise, which I did yesterday at 50, and so on, all the way up to 10 bpm past the top recommended speed for the exercise a little over a week ago. On days when I don’t have much time, I’ll do my best to just quickly learn the new exercise so I can practice it more at 50 bpm the next day. Thankfully I’ve only needed to do that a couple times. At first I struggled with “putting away” the much older exercises when I get so far from them, but was able to relax when I reminded myself that . . .

    * Each day of the week is always the same technique area. Monday is always alternate picking. Tuesday is always string skipping. Saturday is always legato (hammer-ons, pull-offs, slides). Etc. In addition to that, each new week’s exercise builds on or expands the previous week’s, in most cases. I was actually getting frustrated with it at one point because of that. How many legato sequences can you build out of the same Am pentatonic scale? But then one week, it switched up dramatically enough that it felt new again. This at first seemed to me like lazy writing, but I changed my opinion. It is SO important that it is done this way. It’s baby steps. Even advanced players need baby steps with new stuff and with mastering new techniques. Also, this helps my personal practice approach to the book–since, for example, this Thursday’s arpeggio exercise is building yet again on the same ideas from the Thursday exercise from 2, 3, 4 weeks ago, I don’t need to keep practicing those ones. I’m slowly building the complexity, which means I’m able to fly through the old ones without hindrance. With this slow build, however, keep in mind . . .

    * There are a LOT of exercises here. If you stick with this and actually do this over an entire year, it would be impossible for it to not improve your playing. That’s not because the book is magical or something, or so amazingly clever, but because to do so means you’re practicing regularly and advancing slowly but surely. At the start of my sixth week of this book, I was getting a little frustrated that I’d been at it for seemingly so long but so little progress in regards to the complexity of the exercises had been made. So I took some time to finally put both the rhythm CD and the exercise examples CD onto my iPod for easy access. Well, I had to type out and name all 53 tracks on the example CD, and got reminded about how many exercises there really are. Today I do exercise 42. Of 365. My weeks aren’t even in double digits yet.

    So in the end, this is a great book if you use it exactly how they suggest. Don’t make it your only book or source–be sure to throw in some scale sequences, chord progressions, exercises to memorize the note structure of the fretboard, music theory study, and get some tab or something for some songs you like, too–but this book can easily be your daily motivation.
    ==================
    SIX MONTH…

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  2. Mike T. says:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    This the THE book to buy for learning how to play guitar., October 21, 2017
    By 

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    This review is from: Guitar Aerobics: A 52-Week, One-lick-per-day Workout Program for Developing, Improving and Maintaining Guitar Technique Bk/online audio (Paperback)
    This is the book to buy if you’re trying to learn how to play guitar. Specifically the electric guitar.

    The exercises are laid out in a weekly structure and if you follow along, you should be able to learn and play guitar well.

    Definitely recommended.

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  3. Anonymous says:
    4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The Book for Perfect Technique, September 10, 2012
    By 
    Mike T.

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Guitar Aerobics: A 52-Week, One-lick-per-day Workout Program for Developing, Improving and Maintaining Guitar Technique Bk/online audio (Paperback)
    First, I NEVER write product reviews. But in this case I am so impressed that I had to speak up. I have been playing mainly acoustic guitar for around 3 years now. I had seen this book in the stores but never bought it. Recently I became interested in learning more electric guitar technique and decided to buy this book. WOW, I had bought so many books in the past that were a total let down. This book is very well thought out with a plan to get you from beginner to advanced.

    I considered myself an intermediate player, and the book indicates to start around week 18 for intermediate level. This was a little discouraging when I found out that I am nowhere near intermediate level. I have started from the beginning week 1 and this has been perfect for me. It starts out from the very beginning with challenging exercises. I have already developed much greater technique just after a few weeks of using the book.

    Although the book does not mention it, it seems to be more for the electric guitar. Many of the exercises could be used with acoustic, however other exercises may not be appropriate. If you are like me, an acoustic player branching out to electric, this is a perfect book. This book is strictly exercises for developing great technique. If you are looking for fun songs to play, look elsewhere.

    I can’t wait to see what kind of player I am a year from now!

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